Four Street Food Hubs That Will Make The Bon Vivant Feel Alive

  • 21 September 2018
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Street food always plays a pivotal role in the way cities around the world evolve culturally and otherwise. Visitors from all around the world enjoy and relish tantalizing authentic cuisines that are prepared locally with fresh produce. Those who crave for appetizing dishes by the street side always love to travel to different cities around the world and savor the exotic cuisines available. There are many cities around the world which are known for some really heavenly street food. Here are six cities in the world that every street food lover must visit at least once in a lifetime.

 

Bangkok, Thailand

Street food in Bangkok is available in abundance on the sidewalks where vendors in different parts of the city operate on a fixed rotation. If you planning on having breakfast you can visit these vendors for sweet soymilk and bean curd and those looking for lunch can have yummy fragrant rice and poached chicken that is dished out on the vendor carts. You can also try roasted chicken and ducks which interestingly hang from carts. Loads of papaya salads provide that extra dose of veggies and all the proteins that one can possibly think of are satayed. The streets of Bangkok are lined up with a variety of seafood including fried and crisp mussels, barbecued catfish and dancing shrimps. Dishes such as deep-fried pork belly get complemented by light tom yum soup. Expect loads of basil, garlic and chiles on top of nearly every dish. Locals also recommend having sticky mango rice to beat the heat during summer time.


Istanbul, Turkey

Istanbul offers one of the finest street foods which reflect upon the way of life of the locals. Simit a snack available in deli like shops on the streets of Istanbul is a hybrid of a bagel and a pretzel. It is freshly baked and dipped in molasses with sesame seeds on its crust. The streets of Istanbul are replete with Turkish doner kebabs, kumpir that comprises of baked potatoes stuffed with pickles, olives and sausage. You can also enjoy balik ekmek sandwiches topped with a grilled filet of mackerel with lots of greens, onions and a dash of lemon. Then there are rice-stuffed mussels as well as kokorec which are actually spitted lamb intestines. Turkish pizza locally known as lahmacun, is a quick meal available throughout the night on the sidewalks. It is spread with a mix of minced beef, lamb, and peppers.

 
Mexico City, Mexico

Street food in Mexico City dates back to pre-Hispanic times and the streets of Mexico City are always teeming with mouth-watering antojitos such as roasted elotes (corn on the cob), fried corn masa huaraches and cornmeal cakes known as tlacoyos. You can find food stalls throughout the city especially in the bustling markets of Mercado San Juan, in the Cuauhtémoc borough and in the La Merced neighborhood. Street corners house various taco stands where fresh tortillas and grilled meats called tlacoyos await gastronomes with favas, cheese and a dollop of green salsa. Other local favorites include spinning al pastor or rotisserie chicken. You can also look forward to sugary churros and steaming-hot tamales to begin your day early in the morning.

 
Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

The street food in Ho Chi Minh City incorporates a mix of cultures, the city’s French colonial history with Vietnamese spices. Stateside Vietnamese cuisine includes many interesting options for the street food fanatic such as bánh mì sandwiches and pho soup. The streets of Ho Chi Minh City abound with sprawling markets and there is a plethora of feel -good soups, fires meats and fried crustaceans. Regional southern specialties like banh xeo (stuffed pancakes) and canh chua (fish soup) are also widely popular. Those interested in something unconventional can opt for crabs ranging from stir-fried with tamarind to soupified with thick udon-esque noodles in bánh canh cua. Some other noteworthy dishes include com tam (cooked broken rice) with a fried egg on the top, Bo La Lot (seasoned beef in a leaf) served with nuoc mam (fish sauce).

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